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What has AI to do with Theology?

Technological advancements are happening at an accelerated phase. Five decades ago, no one even owned a personal computer. A decade ago, smartphones did not exist. Today there are 2.71 billion smartphone users in the world, which is more than thirty-five percent of the world’s population. Many developments have happened in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI), Robotics, and Mixed Reality.

AI is the term used to describe a machine’s ability to simulate human intelligence. Characteristics once considered unique to humans like learning, logic, reasoning, perception, and creativity are now being replicated by technology and used in every industry. Many movies that show a world ruled by machines have come out, and they have captured the attention of humans and, in some cases, made them concerned about the future of humanity. 

Technology affects many people in positive ways, while many others are addicted. There are serious challenges and questions raised by some of the recent technological advancements. 
It is important to understand the issues raised by AI. The theological implications of these issues have to be identified. How does the current generation view God and their faith in the light of the technological innovations and advancements they experience daily. 

Are there challenges experienced by pastors and Christians who work in the technology field? We need to evaluate different issues raised by AI from a biblical point of view. In the upcoming posts, I will be explaining why theologians and religious leaders should think about AI and how it impacts society.  

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